Privacy and unwanted disclosures of photographs online: the future is wearable?

henry_pearceHenry Pearce
Lecturer in Law and Cohort Tutor at the University of Hertfordshire

The emergence of online social networking sites services has provided us with numerous benefits and has transformed the way in which people work, live, interact and learn. Their use, however, also gives rise to a number of legal and regulatory challenges concerning the privacy of the users of such services. One of the most significant of these challenges is the way in which social networking sites may be used as a means of facilitating the unwanted publication of photographs. It is estimated that approximately 1.8 billion photos are uploaded to social networking platforms each day.[1] Many of these pictures will contain images of identifiable individuals and will have been uploaded without their consent, or against their wishes, and may result in negative consequences. We frequently hear, for example, about individuals missing out on employment opportunities or being blackmailed as a result of personal data distributed via social media.[2] Accordingly, how individuals can be put in a position from which they can exercise control over information shared about them online, photographic or otherwise, and protect their privacy, has become a salient issue for European privacy regulators. An interesting recent development has suggested, however, that technology, rather than the law, might be the best way of securing this objective. Continue reading “Privacy and unwanted disclosures of photographs online: the future is wearable?”

The impact of ‘Brexit’ on British Education and Research Institutions

Mehwisch Khan
Joint Honours (Law and European Languages) student at the University of Hertfordshire

“The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page” –  St. Augustine

The EU has been placed under a refined microscope because of the Eurozone crisis and supranationality of the European Union (EU) considered in parallel to the limited national sovereignty of its Member States (MS). Disgruntled with the overarching position of the EU, current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (UK) David Cameron has been cornered by his party backbenchers into holding a referendum on the 23rd of June 2016. Many have been left alarmed, while others overjoyed. Supporters and opponents pick and choose facts, exaggerate and understate crucial issues in order to woo the support of citizens. Amidst the heated debates of politicians and scholars many have been left feeling overwhelmed and largely misinformed. Words such as “Referendum”, “Eurosceptics”, “Europhiles” and “Brexit” have become part of our daily conversations – but what does a voter really need to know before making a decision?  As an undergraduate and a current Erasmus student I was curious of the potential impact of a Brexit on the education sector, this blog post aims to get a deeper understanding of the British input and European budget for the sector. Continue reading “The impact of ‘Brexit’ on British Education and Research Institutions”

Death and the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) 2015

Edina Harbinja 
Lecturer, University of Hertfordshire; PhD, University of Strathclyde

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Credits to https://twitter.com/jovankurbalija

This was my first time participating in of one of the world’s ‘most important’ internet governance events (arguably and with a lot of critique) – the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), held in Joao Pessoa, Brazil, 9-12 November 2015. The event gathered more than 2,400 participants from all over the world, representing different governments, companies, civil society and academia. The main theme for the 10th IGF was: ‘Evolution of Internet Governance: Empowering Sustainable Development’. Continue reading “Death and the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) 2015”