The Polish media law controversy: national protests and European discontent

Mehwisch Khan
Joint Honours (Law and European Languages) student at the University of Hertfordshire

This post was originally posted by the European Youth Press

On January 7, 2015, Andrej Duda, the current Polish president and key member of Poland’s right wing ‘The Law and Justice Party’ (PiS), approved a media bill that has sparked substantial controversy in his country.  The new Radio and Television Bill allows a political figure, the Treasury Minister, to hire and fire senior figures in public radio and television. The new hiring process, which will no longer be under the control of the National Broadcasting Council, facilitates restrictions on media freedom, censorship and the dispersal of biased information. Continue reading “The Polish media law controversy: national protests and European discontent”

Privacy and unwanted disclosures of photographs online: the future is wearable?

henry_pearceHenry Pearce
Lecturer in Law and Cohort Tutor at the University of Hertfordshire

The emergence of online social networking sites services has provided us with numerous benefits and has transformed the way in which people work, live, interact and learn. Their use, however, also gives rise to a number of legal and regulatory challenges concerning the privacy of the users of such services. One of the most significant of these challenges is the way in which social networking sites may be used as a means of facilitating the unwanted publication of photographs. It is estimated that approximately 1.8 billion photos are uploaded to social networking platforms each day.[1] Many of these pictures will contain images of identifiable individuals and will have been uploaded without their consent, or against their wishes, and may result in negative consequences. We frequently hear, for example, about individuals missing out on employment opportunities or being blackmailed as a result of personal data distributed via social media.[2] Accordingly, how individuals can be put in a position from which they can exercise control over information shared about them online, photographic or otherwise, and protect their privacy, has become a salient issue for European privacy regulators. An interesting recent development has suggested, however, that technology, rather than the law, might be the best way of securing this objective. Continue reading “Privacy and unwanted disclosures of photographs online: the future is wearable?”

Death and the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) 2015

Edina Harbinja 
Lecturer, University of Hertfordshire; PhD, University of Strathclyde

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Credits to https://twitter.com/jovankurbalija

This was my first time participating in of one of the world’s ‘most important’ internet governance events (arguably and with a lot of critique) – the Internet Governance Forum (IGF), held in Joao Pessoa, Brazil, 9-12 November 2015. The event gathered more than 2,400 participants from all over the world, representing different governments, companies, civil society and academia. The main theme for the 10th IGF was: ‘Evolution of Internet Governance: Empowering Sustainable Development’. Continue reading “Death and the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) 2015”